28th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year B) – 14th October 2018

Theme: ATTACHMENT TO WEALTH IS AN OBSTACLE TO CHRISTIAN DISCIPLESHIP

  • Wisdom 7:7-11;
  • Psalm 89 (90): 12-17. R/ v. 14;
  • Hebrews 4:12-13
  • Mark 10:17-30

Today is the 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Liturgical Year B. The gospel today tells us that attachment to wealth is an obstacle to Christian discipleship. (Fuller; Faley)

The gospel today tells us that a rich man came to Jesus to look for eternal life. He was a good man because he kept all the commandments of God. He did not kill, he did not commit adultery, he did not steal, etc. But Jesus asked him to sell all his possessions and give the money to the poor and follow Jesus. The man went away sad because he had great wealth. He did not follow Jesus and become Jesus’ disciple. He was attached to his wealth. The gospel today tells us to be detached from our wealth and to share our wealth with the poor and the needy and to follow Jesus and become His disciple.

The gospel also tells us that it is very hard for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God. In fact it is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God! Again, attachment to wealth is an obstacle to enter the kingdom of God. Again, detach from your wealth, share your wealth with the poor, and enter the kingdom of God! For salvation is “impossible” for men and money, salvation is “possible” only for God!

Finally, the gospel tells us that those who have detached themselves from their wealth and family and followed Jesus will be rewarded a hundred times over with houses, land, mothers, sisters, brothers, children, etc. now in this life and also eternal life in the world to come! That is, they will be rewarded with a Christian community of brothers and sisters, mothers and fathers, and children, who will share with them their houses and lands and possessions! And they will also be rewarded with eternal life in heaven!

The first reading follows the theme of the gospel. The first reading tells us to pray for wisdom and not to pray for wealth, power, health or beauty. When we have wisdom we will know the will of God and all the other things will be given to us as well! Thus we read in the first reading:

“In her company all good things came to me, at her hands riches not to be numbered.” (Ws 7:11; SM)

Solomon did not pray for wealth, power or long life, but Solomon prayed for wisdom and God gave Solomon wisdom as well as wealth, fame and long life! (1 K 3:5-15)

The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the first reading. The responsorial psalm also tells us to pray for wisdom. (NJBC; CCB) Thus the first verse of the first stanza:

“Make us know the shortness of our life that we may gain wisdom of heart.” (Ps 89 (90): 12; SM)

The responsorial psalm also asks us to pray for love and joy. Thus the second stanza:

“In the morning, fill us with your love; we shall exult and rejoice all our days. Give us joy to balance our affliction for the years when we knew misfortune.” (Ps 89 (90): 14-15; SM) 

Thus the response of the responsorial psalm which is taken from the second stanza:

“Fill us with your love that we may rejoice.” (Ps 89 (90): 14; SM)

The second reading is a warning; a warning that the word of God is both judgment and salvation. (CSB) The word of God is judgment for those who do not persevere in the faith and salvation for those who persevere in the faith. It is not enough to have faith. We have to persevere in the faith, especially in times of trials, so that the word of God becomes salvation for us!

Today in this Mass we thank God our Father for his Son Jesus Christ, who suffered died and rose from the dead to give us the Holy Spirit; and we ask God our Father through his Son Jesus Christ to give us the Holy Spirit, so that we may be detached from our wealth, share our wealth with the poor and needy, and follow Jesus and become his disciples. And so that we will have the wisdom to know God’s will. We also ask God to help us persevere in the faith, especially in times of great trials. A happy and joyful Sunday to all of you! Amen!

21st Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A) – 27th August 2017

Theme: THE CHURCH SAVES US FROM HELL AND BRINGS US TO HEAVEN 

  • Isaiah 22:19-23; 
  • Psalm 137:1-3. 6. 8. R/ v. 8; 
  • Romans 11:33-36 
  • Matthew 16:13-20

1. Today is the 21st Sunday in Ordinary Time, Liturgical Year A. The gospel today tells us that Jesus chose Peter to be the first Pope of the Church! More importantly, the gospel tells us that the Church saves us from hell and brings us to heaven! Thus we read: 

“You are Peter and on this rock I will build my Church. And the gates of the underworld can never hold out against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of  heaven; whatever you bind on earth shall be considered bound in heaven; whatever you loose on earth shall be considered loosed in heaven.” (Mt 16:18-19; SM) 

All of us know that Christ died on Good Friday and rose from the dead on Easter Sunday! But not all of us know what Christ did on Holy Saturday! On Holy Saturday Christ went to hell to save Adam and Eve our first parents! This we can read from “an ancient homily for Holy Saturday” on “The Lord’s descent into hell” from the Office of Readings for Holy Saturday! Thus we read in 1 Peter 3:19: 

“…. he went to preach to the spirits in prison.” (NJBh) 

And thus we profess in the Apostles’ Creed every Sunday Mass: 

“…. was crucified, died and was buried; he descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; ….” 

Again, the Church saves us from hell and brings us to heaven! The authority to “bind” and “loose” is the Church’s authority to teach, to forgive sins, to exorcise and to excommunicate! (HCSB/NJBC) 

Today our Pope Francis is the direct successor of Peter the first Pope in an unbroken line of 266 Popes! And our Bishops are the direct successors of the Twelve Apostles! 

That is why we pray for our Pope and our Bishops at every Mass! But we have to pray for them even outside Mass! 

2. The first reading follows the theme of the gospel. The first reading tells us that the Lord calls Eliakim to be the master of the palace of king Hezekiah of Judah who lived in the 8th and 7th century Before Christ (BC). One of the functions of the master of the king’s palace was to open and close the door of the king’s palace. Thus we read in the first reading: 

 “I place the key of the House of David on his shoulder; should he open, no one 

shall close, should he close, no one shall open.” (Is 22:22; SM) 

The first reading prefigures and prophesizes the choosing of Peter to open and close the door of the kingdom of heaven! Thus we read: 

“I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven”! (Mt 16:19; SM) 

3. The responsorial psalm is a thanksgiving for salvation! The responsorial psalm has three stanzas. The first and second stanzas are a thanksgiving for salvation. (NJBC) 

Particularly, salvation through the Church of Christ! The third stanza from which the response is taken is an expression of confidence in God and a prayer asking God to connue to save us! (HCSB) Particularly through his Church! Thus we responded three times: 

“Your love, O Lord, is eternal, discard not the work of your hands.” (Ps 137:8; SM) 

4. The second reading is a continuation and a conclusion of the second reading of last Sunday. It is a hymn to the merciful wisdom of God in his plan of salvation! (NJBC/CSB) 

The second reading of last Sunday tells us that the disobedience of the Jews made God show mercy to the pagans and the jealousy of the Jews of the pagans made God show mercy to the Jews and finally the disobedience of the Jews and pagans made God show mercy to all humankind! Such is the merciful wisdom of God in his plan of salvation! 

But the hymn ends with a doxology/praise to God, not only for salvation, but also for creation! Thus the hymn concludes: 

“All that exists comes from him; all is by him and for him. To him be glory for ever! Amen.” (Rm 11:36; SM) 

Today, we too give glory to God, not only for salvation, but also for creation! We are created in the image of God to be the co-creators of God to create life and not to destroy life! But today we are destroying life and thus the ecological crisis and the environmental destruction! But there is good news! 

In 2014, on 2nd to the 5th of September, in the Sacred Heart Cathedral, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia, the Justice and Peace Commission of the Bishops’ Conference of Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei gathered and had a meeting on Creation! The vision was “Communion with all Creation” and the mission was “Stewardship of Creation”! 

Science tells us that Creation and humanity are a Community! But Creation and Humanity are not yet in Communion! Creation and Humanity will be in Communion when humanity becomes the stewards of Creation! 

5. Today we thank God for his Church, particularly for our Pope and Bishops, and we continue to pray for them as we pray for them at every Mass! Today we also thank God not only for Salvation, but also for Creation and we ask God to help us to be stewards of Creation so that we will be in Communion with all Creation! Amen! 

17th Sunday of Ordinary Time (Year A) – 30th July 2017

Theme: SEEK FIRST THE KINGDOM OF GOD AND HIS SALVATION AND ALL THE OTHER THINGS WILL BE GIVEN TO US AS WELL

  • 1 Kings 3:5. 7-12;
  • Psalm 118:57. 72. 76-77. 127-130. R/ v. 97;
  • Romans 8:28-30
  • Matthew 13:44-52 (Shorter Form, 13:44-46)

Today is the 17th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Liturgical Year A. The readings today tell us to seek first the kingdom of God/heaven and his righteousness/salvation and all the other things will be given to us as well!
The gospel today tells us that the kingdom of God is like a treasure hidden in a field which someone has found, he buries it again, goes off happy and sells all that he owns and buys the field! The gospel also tells us that the kingdom of God is like a merchant looking for fine pearls and when he finds one of great value, he sells all that he owns and he buys the pearl!
The gospel today tells us to sell all that we own and buy the kingdom of God! The gospel today tells us to sell all our houses, cars, business, property, land, etc. in order to buy the kingdom of God! In other words the gospel today tells us to seek first the kingdom of God/heaven and his righteousness/salvation (CSB) and all the other things will be given to us as well! (Mt 6:33)
The pagans seek first the kingdom of the world and its damnation and all they get is sin and death! The pagans seek wealth, power and fame, that is, the three temptations of the Devil (Mt 4:1-11) and all they get is sin and death!
We Christians seek first the kingdom of heaven/God and his righteousness/salvation and all the other things will be given to us as well! We seek first the love, mercy, forgiveness and salvation of God! We seek first the love, joy and peace of God and all the other things, including wealth, power and fame will be given to us as well!

The first reading follows the theme of the gospel. The first reading tells us that Solomon asked God for wisdom to discern between good and evil so that he can govern God’s people! Solomon did not ask for wealth and long life!
More importantly, the first reading tells us that God was happy with the request of Solomon and God granted Solomon wisdom and more than that, God also gave Solomon riches and long life which Solomon did not ask for! (1Kgs 3:13-14)
Again, seek first the kingdom of God and his salvation and all the other things will be given to us as well!

The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the first reading. The responsorial psalm tells us to look for God’s law and love and not to look for silver and gold! That is why we responded four times:
“Lord how I love your law!” (Ps 118:97; SM)
The responsorial psalm has four stanzas. The first stanza tells us to look for God’s law and not to look for silver and gold:
“My part, I have resolved, O Lord, is to obey your word. The law from your mouth means more to me than silver and gold.” (Ps 118:57. 72; SM)

The second stanza tells us that the law of God gives us love:
“Let your love be ready to console me, by your promise to your servant. Let your love come to me and I shall live, for your law is my delight.” (Ps 118:76-77; SM)

The second reading does not follow the theme of the Sunday, but the second reading has something very important to tell us! The second reading tells us that everything works for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose! Everything, good as well as evil, because God can draw good out of evil! That is what Joseph told his brothers in Genesis 50:20:
“The evil you planned to do me has by God’s design been turned to good, to bring about the present result: the survival of a numerous people.” (NJB)
Joseph prefigures Jesus Christ in the New Testament! The Jewish leaders put Jesus Christ to death on the cross, but God raised him from the dead and through him gave the Holy Spirit and saved the whole world! And according to Saint Paul even the Jews who put Jesus Christ to death on the cross will also be saved at the end of the world! (Romans, Chapter 11)

Today, we thank God our Father for his Son Jesus Christ who established his kingdom here on earth, and we ask God our Father to give us the Holy Spirit, so that we will seek first the kingdom of God and his salvation, and all the other things will be given to us as well! Amen!

15th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A) – 16th July 2017

Theme: THE WORD OF GOD WILL BEAR FRUIT ABUNDANTLY IN SPITE OF REJECTIONS, PERSECUTIONS AND THE TEMPTATIONS OF THE WORLD 

  • Isaiah 55:10-11;
  • Psalm 64 (65):10-14. R/ Lk 8:8;
  • Romans 8:18-23
  • Matthew 13:1-9. 18-23 (Shorter Form)

Today is the 15th Sunday of the Year, Liturgical Year A. Today is also “Bible Sunday” for Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei. The readings today tell us that the word of God will bear fruit abundantly, in spite of rejections, persecutions and the temptations of the world.

The gospel today tells us of the parable of the sower. The gospel today tells us that a sower went out to sow and as he sowed, some seeds fell besides the path and the birds ate them up. These are the people who reject the word of God. Some seeds fell on rocks where the soil was shallow. They took no root and when the sun rose they were scorched. These are the people who accepted the word of God, but because of persecutions they gave up. Some seeds fell among thorns and the thorns grew up and choked them. These are the people who at first accepted the word of God, but because of the temptations of the world, they bore no fruit. Some seeds fell on rich soil and they produced a hundred-fold, sixty-fold, thirty-fold. The usual harvest is about eight-fold. (Fuller)

Again, the gospel today tells us that the word of God will ultimately bear abundant fruit, in spite of rejections, persecutions and the temptations of the world. We are therefore to proclaim the word of God in season and out of season!

The first reading follows the theme of the gospel. The first reading tells us that the word of God is like the rain. The rain does not return to God empty, but the rain waters the earth to make it bear fruit. The word of God does not return to God empty, but the word of God makes us bear spiritual fruits! Thus we read in the first reading:

“As the rain and the snow come down from the heavens and do not return without watering the earth, making it yield and giving growth to provide seed for the sower and bread for the eating, so the word that goes from my mouth does not return to me empty, without carrying out my will and succeeding in what it was sent to do.” (Is 55:10-11; SM)

The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the first reading. The responsorial psalm is a reflection on the first reading. The responsorial psalm also tells us that the word of God makes us bear fruit. Thus the response of the responsorial psalm:

“Some seed fell into rich soil and produced its crop.” (Lk 8:8; SM)

The responsorial psalm tells us that God sends down rain to water the earth to make the earth bear fruit, to make the wheat grow and the flocks of sheep multiply. In the same way God sends us the word of God to make us bear fruit. Thus we read in the first and fourth stanzas of the responsorial psalm:

“You care for the earth, give it water, you fill it with riches. Your river in heaven brims over to provide its grain.

The hills are girded with joy, the meadows covered with flocks, the valleys are decked with wheat. They shout for joy, yes, they sing.” (Ps 64 (65): 10. 13b-14; SM)

Again, the word of God is like the rain. It makes us bear spiritual fruits!

The second reading does not follow the theme of the Sunday, but the second reading has something important to tell us. The second reading tells us that we are intimately connected to creation, so much so that when we sin, creation also suffers the consequences, but more importantly, when we are saved, creation is also blessed.

An Australian theologian by the name of Denis Edwards tells us that we are intimately connected with creation. He tells us that we all came from the same “Big Bang” about 14 billion years ago, we all came from the same supernova about 5 billion years ago, we all came from the same biological evolution which began on earth about 4 billion years ago, and today we share the same environment.

But more importantly, he tells us that it is in human beings that creation became conscious of itself, that is, self-awareness. And it is in human beings that creation consciously and freely gives praise to God.

But when humans sinned and stop giving praise to God, creation also suffers its consequences. Today, the consequences of human sins can be seen in the destruction of creation, in the destruction of the rainforest, global warming, climate change, the destruction of other species, environmental pollution, desertification, etc.

More importantly, the second reading tells us that when humans are saved from sin, creation will also be blessed and restored to its original and pristine state!

Pope John Paul II said something similar in his “World Day of Peace” Message (1.1.1990) entitled: “Peace with God the Creator, Peace with all of Creation”.

Today is also “Bible Sunday” for Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei. The Regional Biblical Commission of Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei has a message for us based on the Apostolic Exhortation of Pope Benedict XVI (Verbum Domini – The Word of the Lord, 2010). We will summarize the message in 8 points:

(i) The word of God in Creation. God speaks to us in Creation.

(ii) The word of God in History. God speaks to us in the History of Israel.

(iii) The word of God in the Prophets. The Prophets help us understand the word of God.

(iv) Jesus Christ is the Word of God. Jesus Christ died, rose from the dead and gave us the Holy Spirit.

(v) The word of God in the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit was given to the Church.

(vi) The word of God in the Church.

(vii) The word of God in the Living Tradition of the Church.

(viii) The word of God in the Bible of the Church.

Let us then continue to proclaim the word of God, share and pray it in BECs (Basic Ecclesial Communities), share and pray it in “Bible-Sharing” groups every Monday, and celebrate it every Wednesday! Amen!

Easter Sunday (Mass of the Day)

Theme: THE DEATH AND RESURRECTION OF JESUS CHRIST AND OUR DEATH AND RESURRECTION WITH HIM IN THE SACRAMENT OF BAPTISM!

  • Acts 10:34. 37-43;
  • Psalm 117:1-2. 16-17. 22-23. R/ v. 24;
  • Colossians 3:1-4
  • John 20:1-9

A Happy and Blessed Easter to all of you! Today we celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ; and our death and resurrection with him in the sacrament of Baptism!
The gospel today tells us that the Lord has risen from the dead! The gospel tells us that Mary of Magdala went to the tomb early Sunday morning and saw that the stone had been moved away. She ran quickly to Peter and John and told them that the Lord had been taken away and that she did not know where they had put him.
Peter and John ran quickly to the tomb. John reached the tomb first, but did not go in. He bent down and saw the burial cloths on the ground. Peter reached the tomb later and went straight in and saw the burial cloths on the ground and also the cloth that covered Jesus’ head rolled up in a place by itself. John then went into the tomb and saw and believed!
The burial cloths on the ground and the cloth that covered Jesus’ head tell us that the Lord was not stolen by his disciples, but the Lord had risen from the dead; if not, the burial cloths would not be on the ground, but would be taken away, and the cloth that covered Jesus’ head would not be rolled up in a place by itself! Indeed the Lord has risen from the dead!
The first reading tells us that Peter and the Apostles were witnesses to the resurrection of the Lord! They ate and drank with him after his resurrection and they spent forty days with him after his resurrection! (Ac 10:41o; NJB)
More importantly, the first reading tells us that Peter and the Apostles proclaimed the good news of the Lord’s death and resurrection and that whoever believes in him will have their sins forgiven in his name in the sacrament of Baptism! That is why in the Bible, immediately following this first reading, is the “Baptism of the first gentiles”! (Ac 10:44-48; NJB)
The second reading tells us about the sacrament of Baptism! (Col 2:12; NJB) The second reading tells us that in Baptism we have been brought back to life with Jesus Christ and that is why we have to look for the things of heaven! Our thoughts must be on heavenly things and not on the things of the earth, because we have died with Christ and our lives are now hidden with Christ in God. But at the second coming of Jesus Christ at the “parousia”; Jesus Christ will be revealed in all his glory and we will share in the fullness of his glory! (Col 3:4b; NJB)
The responsorial psalm is a thanksgiving for salvation in the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ! Thus we responded three times:

“Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia!” Alleluia means Praise the Lord!

The responsorial psalm has three stanzas. The first stanza tells us to praise and thank God for his infinite love! The second stanza tells us that the Lord saves us from death! The third stanza tells us about the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ! Thus we read in the third stanza:

“The stone which the builders rejected has become the corner stone.” (Ps 117:22; Mt 21:42; Ac 4:11; CSB)
And it is all God’s work! Thus we read again in the third stanza:
“This is the work of the Lord, a marvel in our eyes.” (Ps 117:23; SM)
That is why we give praise and thanks to God in the response:
“Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia!”
That is, “Praise the Lord, Praise the Lord, Praise the Lord!”
We will now renew our Baptism! We will renew our Baptism with the light of Jesus Christ! The light of the Resurrection! The light that has destroyed the darkness of sin and death! The light that has destroyed the Devil! The light that has destroyed Satan!
The light of Christ is the light of faith as opposed to unbelief which is darkness, the light of Christ is the light of life as opposed to death which is darkness, and the light of Christ is the light of good as opposed to evil which is darkness! (Jn 8:12b; NJB)
More importantly, the three themes are related! For it is in faith that we receive the new and eternal life from God and the life from God is good, because only God is good!
Most importantly, Light will overcome darkness, faith will overcome unbelief, life will overcome death, and good will overcome evil, because Jesus Christ has overcome the Devil! Jesus has overcome Satan!
And the new life that Jesus gives is even better than the old life before sin! Thus we sing in the Easter Proclamation:
“O happy fault, O necessary sin of Adam, which gained for us so great a Redeemer!”
We will light our candles from the Easter candle and we will profess our faith in God by answering “I do” to six questions! The first three questions reject Satan and all his works and all his empty promises; because Satan tells us not to believe in God! The second three questions profess our faith in God the Father who created the world, God the Son who saved the world, and God the Holy Spirit who continues to sanctify the world!
After that we will be sprinkled with holy water, that is, the waters of baptism, the waters of the Holy Spirit! And we will die and rise with Jesus Christ to the new and eternal life of Easter! A Happy and Blessed Easter to all of you! Amen!

Palm Sunday of The Lord’s Passion (Year A)

Theme: THE PASSION OF THE LORD IS VICTORIOUS!

  • Matthew 21:1-11; Isaiah 50:4-7;
  • Psalm 21:8-9. 17-20. 23-24. R/ v. 2;
  • Philippians 2:6-11
  • Matthew 26:14-27:66 (Shorter Form, Matthew 27:11-54)

Today we celebrate “Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion”; Liturgical Year A! We celebrate Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion, because the Passion of the Lord is victorious and the palm branch is a symbol of victory!

The first gospel that we read at the blessing of the palm branches tells us that the Passion of the Lord is victorious! The first gospel tells us that Jesus entered Jerusalem. Jesus entered Jerusalem to suffer, to die and to rise from the dead in order to give the Holy Spirit for the salvation of the whole world! The Passion of the Lord is victorious not only for the Lord, but for all of us sinners as well! That is why the gospel tells us that the crowds welcomed Jesus with palm branches! Palm branches are a symbol of victory!

The second gospel today that we have just read also tells us that the Passion of the Lord is victorious! The second gospel tells us that Barabbas the notorious prisoner was set free, because Jesus the innocent one was condemned to death in his place! The gospel also tells us that after the death of Jesus the veil of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom, that is, the holy of holies which was accessible only to the high priest and only once a year is now accessible to all everyday! The gospel also tells us that the dead rose to life and that the pagan centurion and his fellow-guards were converted! Indeed the Passion of the Lord is victorious and salvific!

 

The first reading follows the theme of the gospel. The first reading also tells us that the Passion of the Lord is victorious! The first reading is the third of four suffering-servant songs of Isaiah. It tells us of the vicarious suffering of the suffering-servant of the Lord, that is, the suffering-servant suffers on behalf of sinners for the salvation of sinners! Thus we read in the first reading:

    “I offered my back to those who struck me, my cheeks to those who tore at my beard; I did not cover my face against insult and spittle. The Lord comes to my help, so that I am untouched by the insults. So, too, I set my face like flint; I know I shall not be shamed.” (Is 50:6-7; SM)

 

The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the first reading. The responsorial psalm also tells us that the Passion of the Lord is victorious! The responsorial psalm begins with a cry of despair, but it ends with a prayer of hope! Thus the responsorial psalm begins with the response:

“My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” (Ps 21:2; SM)

But it ends with a “thanksgiving for rescue”! (NJB) Thus the last stanza of the responsorial psalm:

“I will tell of your name to my brethren and praise you where they are assembled. You who fear the Lord give him praise; all sons of Jacob, give him glory. Revere him, Israel’s sons.” (Ps 21: 23-24; SM)

 

Finally, the second reading also tells us that the Passion of the Lord is victorious! The second reading tells us that Christ became humbler still, by accepting death on the cross, but God raised him up and gave him a name above every name! Thus we read in the second reading as quoted in the Gospel Acclamation today:

“Christ was humbler yet, even to accepting death, death on a cross. But God raised him high and gave him the name which is above all names.” (Ph 2:8-9; SM)

We put our palm branches with the crucifix, because the Passion of the Lord is victorious! It is resurrection, life, glory and salvation!

    

Today with the celebration of “Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion”, we begin Holy Week! Holy Week will climax in the Easter Triduum of three days, that is, Good Friday, Holy Saturday and Easter Sunday! But Good Friday begins with Holy Thursday Evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper and Easter Sunday begins with the Easter Vigil! The Easter Triduum which celebrates the death (Good Friday), burial (Holy Saturday), and resurrection (Easter Sunday) of the Lord is one celebration!

That is why there will be no dismissal after the Holy Thursday Mass and there will be no dismissal after the Good Friday Service! The dismissal will only be given after the Easter Vigil Mass! That is why it is important that we participate in the whole Easter Triduum of three days in order to die and rise with Jesus Christ to the new life of Easter! A blessed Holy Week to all of you and a blessed Easter Triduum to all of you! Amen!