3rd Sunday of Easter (Year C) – 5th May 2019

Theme: THE MISSION OF THE CHURCH TO PREACH THE GOOD NEWS FOR THE SALVATION OF THE WORLD

  • Acts 5:27-32. 40-41;
  • Psalm 29 (30):2. 4-6. 11-13. R/ v. 2;
  • Apocalypse 5:11-14
  • John 21:1-19 (Shorter Form, 21:1-14)

Today is the 3rd Sunday of Easter, Liturgical year C. The readings today tell us about the mission of the Church to preach the good news for the salvation of the world!

The gospel today tells us that the disciples were fishing the whole night in the Sea of Tiberias, but they caught nothing! More importantly, the gospel tells us that the Risen Lord appeared to them and instructed them to cast their net on the right side of the boat and they caught so many fish that they could not pull the net in!

The gospel also tells us that when the Risen Lord asked for some of the fish they have caught, Peter pulled in the net with 153 big fish and the net was not broken!

Finally the gospel tells us that the Risen Lord invited the disciples for breakfast. He took the bread and gave it to them and he did the same with the fish!

The gospel ends by telling us that this was the third time that the Risen Lord appeared to the disciples!

The gospel today tells us of 3 important things:

(i) That the mission of the Church is to preach the good news for the salvation of the world! That is, the mission of the Church is to be the fisher of men, to catch men for God! In the Early Church fish symbolizes the baptized Christian in the waters of baptism! (Lefrois) The boat symbolizes the Church!

More importantly, the gospel tells us that without the Risen Lord our mission will be a failure, we will not catch anything; but with the Risen Lord our mission will be a success, we will catch so many fish that we will not be able to pull the net in!

(ii) That Peter is the head of the Church, and that the mission of the Church is universal, and that though the Church is universal, it is a unity under Peter the first Pope! Thus when Risen Lord requested for some fish, it was Peter who pulled the net in, and though there were 153 large fish, the net did not break! The 153 big fish symbolizes the universal mission of the Church and the unbroken net symbolizes the unity of the Church! 

(iii) That the Risen Lord is present with us today in the Eucharist! Thus the Risen Lord took the bread and gave it to the disciples and he did the same with the fish. The Lord did the same thing at the “multiplication of the loaves” which is a symbol of the Eucharist! (Jn 6:11)

Similarly, the gospel of Luke on “the road to Emmaus” tells us that the Risen Lord is present in the Word of God, in the Eucharist and in the Community! (Lk 24: 13-35) This gospel of Luke is read on the 3rd Sunday of Easter, Year A.

The gospel ends by telling us that this is the 3rd time that the Risen Lord appeared to the disciples!

The first reading follows the theme of the gospel. The first reading tells us that the apostles and the Holy Spirit are the witnesses to the resurrection of the Lord! That is, the apostles filled with the Holy Spirit are the witnesses of the resurrection of the Lord! (Ac 1:8; Mt 10:20; NJB) The apostles filled with the Holy Spirit witnessed to the resurrection of the Lord by proclaiming the Good News of the resurrection even in the face of persecution and death:

“It was the God of our ancestors who raised up Jesus, but it was you who had him executed by hanging on a tree. By his own right hand God has now raised him up to be leader and savior, to give repentance and forgiveness of sins through him to Israel. We are witnesses to all this, we and the Holy Spirit whom God has given to those who obey him.” (Ac 5:30-32; SM)   

The responsorial psalm is a thanksgiving for salvation! In the responsorial psalm today we praise and thank God for saving us through his Son Jesus Christ! Thus the response of the responsorial psalm:

“I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me.” (Ps 29 (30): 2; SM)

The responsorial psalm has three stanzas. The first stanza praises and thanks God for salvation (vv. 2 & 4). The second stanza invites others to praise and thank God for salvation (vv. 5-6). The third stanza continues to praise and thank God for salvation (vv. 11-13). (CSB)

he second reading is a doxology. The second reading has two parts. In the first part the angels in heaven give glory, praise, honor and power to the Lamb of God who saved us (vv. 11-12)! In the second part the whole of creation gives glory, praise, honor and power to God the Father and to the Lamb of God (vv. 13-14)! (CSB)

Today we join the angels in heaven and the whole of creation to give glory, praise, honor and power to God the Father and to the Lamb of God for our salvation!

Today we thank God for the resurrection of Jesus Christ and we ask God to give us the Holy Spirit so that we may proclaim the good news of the resurrection, so that all may believe and be baptized and be saved! A happy Easter to all of you! Amen!

5th Sunday of Lent – 7th Apr 2019

Theme: DO YOU BELIEVE THAT JESUS IS THE RESURRECTION AND THE LIFE?

  • Ezekiel 37:12-14;
  • Psalm 129. R/ v. 7;
  • Romans 8:8-11
  • John 11:1-45 (Shorter Form, John 11:3-7. 17. 20-27. 33-45.)

Today is the 5th Sunday of Lent, Liturgical Year A. We use Liturgical Year A, because there will be catechumens for baptism on Easter Vigil Night!

The gospel today tells us that Jesus is the resurrection and the life and that whoever believes in him even though he dies he will live and that whoever lives and believes in him will never die!

That is, Jesus is the resurrection and the life, whoever believes in him even though he dies in his sins he will live and whoever lives and believes in him will never die in his sins, that is, he will never sin and die!

The question is:

“Do you believe this?” (Jn 11:26; SM)

This is the question that the gospel asks us today! This is the question that Jesus asked Martha! And Martha answered:

“Yes Lord, I believe that you are the Christ, the Son of God, the one who was to come into this world.” (Jn 11:27; SM) 

And because of Martha’s faith and belief, Jesus raised her brother Lazarus from the dead:

“Lazarus, here! Come out!” (Jn 11:43; SM)

And the dead Lazarus came out! Lazarus was dead for four days!

On Easter Vigil Night we will also be questioned about our faith and belief! We will be asked 6 questions, 3 rejecting Satan and 3 professing our faith in God! We reject Satan and all his works and all his empty promises, because Satan tempts us not to believe in God as he tempted Adam and Jesus not to believe in God! (1st Sunday of Lent, Year A)

More importantly, we will be asked the 3 questions of faith and belief:

(i)  “Do you believe in God, the Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth?”

(ii) “Do you believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord, who was born of the Virgin Mary, was crucified, died and was buried, rose from the dead, and is now seated at the right hand of the Father?”

(iii) “Do you believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and life everlasting?” (SM)

And when we answer “I do” 6 times, we will be baptized in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit and we will die and rise with Jesus Christ to the new life of Easter! For those of us who are already baptized we will be sprinkled with the waters of baptism and we will die and rise with Jesus Christ to the new life of Easter!

The first reading tells us that the Lord will raise us from the dead through the power of the Holy Spirit!

The raising of Lazarus was only resuscitation. It was only a sign of the resurrection. It was not the resurrection! Lazarus had to die again. But to raise us from the dead Jesus himself had to die and rise from the dead and give us the Holy Spirit! Thus we read in the caption of the first reading:

“I shall put my spirit in you, and you will live.” (Ezk 37:14; SM)

The first reading was originally addressed to the exiled Jews in Babylon.

The second reading also tells us that it is through the power of the Holy Spirit that the Lord will raise us from the dead!

The second reading was addressed to the baptized, but today it is addressed to the baptized and especially to the catechumens to be baptized this coming Easter Vigil Night! Thus we read in the second reading:

“If the Spirit of him who raised Jesus from the dead is living in you, then he who raised Jesus from the dead will give life to your own mortal bodies through his Spirit living in you.” (Rm 8:11; SM)

The responsorial psalm is a penitential psalm. It is a “prayer for pardon and mercy”. (CSB) The responsorial psalm has four stanzas. The first and second stanzas are a prayer for forgiveness. The third and fourth stanzas are an expression of trust. (Faley) Thus the response of the responsorial psalm which is taken from the fourth stanza:

“With the Lord there is mercy and fullness of redemption.” (Ps 129 (130): 7; SM)

During this time of Lent the Church asks us to pray, to fast and to give alms to the poor; not as a law or punishment, but to help us repent so that we may be baptized or renew our baptism on Easter Vigil Night and die and rise with Jesus Christ to the new life of Easter! A Happy and Blessed Lent to all of you! Amen!

7th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) 24th Feb 2019

Theme: BE MERCIFUL AS YOUR HEAVENLY FATHER IS MERCIFUL

  • 1 Samuel 26:2. 7-9. 12-13. 22-23
  • Psalm 102:1-4. 8. 10. 12-13. R. v. 8
  • 1 Corinthians 15:45-49
  • Luke 6:27-38 

Today is the 7th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C. The readings today tell us to be merciful just as our heavenly Father is merciful.

The gospel tells us to be merciful just as our heavenly Father is merciful. The gospel tells us not to judge, so that we will not be judged; not to condemn, so that we will not be condemned; to forgive, and we will be forgiven; and to give, and much will be given to us!

The gospel also tells us to love our enemies; to do good to those who hate us; to bless those who curse us; to pray for those who persecute us; to the one who strikes us on the cheek, turn the other cheek to him; to the one who takes our coat, give him also our shirt (undergarment); give to the one who asks; and to the one who robs us, do not ask him to return what is robbed!

Again, the gospel asks us to love our enemies, to do good, and to lend without expecting to be paid back. We will then be rewarded, and we will be children of our heavenly Father who is kind even to the ungrateful and the wicked. Again, be merciful as your heavenly Father is merciful!

The first reading follows the theme of the gospel. The first reading tells us that David was merciful to King Saul. King Saul tried to kill David twice, and twice David could have killed King Saul, but did not. David spared the life of King Saul twice; once in the cave where David cut off the corner of his cloak instead of killing him (1 S 24); and once David took away his spear and jar of water when he was asleep instead of killing him (1 S 26). David was merciful to King Saul.

The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the first reading. Again, the responsorial psalm tells us that the Lord is compassion and love. Thus the response of the responsorial psalm: “The Lord is compassion and love.”! (Ps 102:8) And thus the third and fourth stanzas of the responsorial psalm: “The Lord is compassion and love, slow to anger and rich in mercy. He does not treat us according to our sins nor repay us according to our faults. As far as the east is from the west so far does he remove our sins. As a father has compassion on his sons, the Lord has pity on those who fear him.”! (Ps 102: 8. 10. 12-13)

Again, the second reading tells us of the resurrection of the dead. The second readings of the 5th and 6th Sundays also told us about the resurrection of the dead. The second reading today tells us about the resurrected body, that is, what kind of body is the resurrection body. Paul tells us in the second reading that the resurrected body will not be the natural physical body of Adam, but it will be the spiritual body of the Second Adam, that is, the Resurrected Christ! (CSB/NJB)

Today in the Eucharist, we celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and we eat his body and drink his blood, and our Risen Lord will give us the Holy Spirit, and raise us from the dead! He will give us the Holy Spirit to help us to be merciful as our heavenly Father is merciful (Lk 6:36)! He will give us the Holy Spirit to help us to love our enemies, to pray for those who persecute us, to bless those who curse us, to do good to those who hate us; and to give to those who ask (Lk 6: 27-30); ………….. to love our enemies and to do good to them; and to lend without hope of return (Lk 6:35); ……….. to forgive; and to give (Lk 6:37-38)! Amen!

6th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 17th Feb 2019

Theme: TRUST IN GOD; NOT IN MAN

  • Jeremiah 17:5-8;
  • Psalm 1:1-4. 6. R/ Ps 39:5;
  • 1 Corinthians 15:12. 16-20
  • Luke 6:17. 20-26

Today is the 6th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Liturgical Year C. The readings today tell us to trust in God and not to trust in man, in the world, in money, etc.

The gospel today tells us that the poor are happy because the kingdom of God belongs to them. That is, in the kingdom of God, the rich will share their money with the poor, and there will be love (charity), justice and peace (shalom)! More importantly, the gospel tells us that the poor are happy because they trust in God and not in man, in the world, in money, etc. (Fuller/Faley)

The gospel also tells us that the rich will not be happy because they do not share their money with the poor. They do not practice justice and charity (love). More importantly, the gospel also tells us that the rich will not be happy, because they do not trust in God, but they trust in man, in the world, in money, etc.

In short, the gospel today tells us to trust in God and not to trust in man, and to share our money with the poor, so that there will be love (charity), justice and peace (shalom)! And all of us will be happy!

The first reading follows the theme of the gospel. The first reading tells us not to trust in man, but to trust in God.

The first reading tells us that the man who trusts in man is cursed. He is like a shrub planted in the desert where there is no water and no life. Where there is only salt and sand. No good can come to him and no good can come from him!

But more importantly, the first reading tells us that the man who trusts in God is blessed. He is like a tree planted next to a stream of water. Even when it is hot its leaves remain green and even when there is no rain it still bears fruit! This is because its roots draw water from the ever flowing stream! Thus we read in the first reading:

“A blessing on the man who puts his trust in the Lord, with the Lord for his hope. He is like a tree by the waterside that thrusts its roots to the stream: when the heat comes it feels no alarm, its foliage stays green; it has no worries in a year of drought, and never ceases to bear fruit.”! (Jr 17:7-8)   

The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the first reading. The responsorial psalm tells us to trust in God. Thus the response of the responsorial psalm:

“Happy the man who has placed his trust in the Lord.”! (Ps 39 (40):5/SM)

The responsorial psalm has three stanzas. The first stanza tells us to trust in God by avoiding the wicked and by keeping the laws of God. (Ps 1:1-2) The second stanza tells us that if we trust in God we are like a tree planted next to a stream. Its leaves are always green and it always bears fruit! And all that we do will succeed! Thus we read in the second stanza of the responsorial psalm:

“He is like a tree that is planted beside the flowing waters, that yields its fruit in due season and whose leaves shall never fade; and all that he does shall prosper.” (Ps 1:3)      

The third stanza tells us that the wicked who does not trust in God by keeping His law will be like winnowed chaff blown away by the wind. For the Lord protects the just, but the way of the wicked leads to doom. (Ps 1:4. 6)

The second reading does not follow the theme of the Sunday. The second reading is a continuation of last Sunday’s second reading. Again, in the second reading today, Paul tells the Corinthians to believe in the bodily resurrection of the dead!

Paul tells the Corinthians that if they do not believe in the resurrection of the dead, they do not believe in the resurrection of Jesus Christ, their faith is useless, and their sins are not forgiven and they are not saved!

The Corinthians believed that their sins were forgiven and that they were saved, so they had to believe in the resurrection of Jesus Christ and in the bodily resurrection of the dead!

More importantly, Paul tells the Corinthians that Jesus Christ has been raised from the dead and he is the first-fruits, and that they, the rest of the harvest, will be raised with him from the dead! Thus we read in the second reading:

“But Christ has in fact been raised from the dead, the first-fruits of all who have fallen asleep.” (1 Co 15:20/SM)    

Today in the Eucharist, we celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and we eat his body and drink his blood, and the Risen Lord will give us the Holy Spirit.

The Holy Spirit will help us to trust in God and not in man, in the world, and in money, etc. The Holy Spirit will help us share our money with the poor by practicing justice and charity.

The Holy Spirit will help us believe in the bodily resurrection of the dead and the resurrection of Jesus Christ, so that our sins will be forgiven and we will be saved!    Amen!

3rd Sunday of Easter (Year B) – 15th April 2018

Theme: BE WITNESSES OF THE RESURRECTION AND PREACH REPENTANCE FOR THE FORGIVENESS OF SINS

  • Acts 3:13-15. 17-19;
  • Psalm 4:2. 4. 7. 9. R/ v. 7;
  • 1 John 2:1-5
  • Luke 24:35-48 

A Happy Easter to all of you! Today is the 3rd Sunday of Easter, Liturgical Year B. The readings today tell us to be the witnesses of the resurrection and to preach repentance for the forgiveness of sins.

The gospel today tells us that on the day of his resurrection the Lord appeared to his disciples and said to them, ‘Peace be with you!’ That is, shalom, salvation! A peace that the world cannot give! (Jn 14:27; CSB) And he showed them his hands and his feet. He also asked them to touch him for he has flesh and bones. He is not a ghost. A ghost has no flesh and bones. The disciples were filled with joy when they saw the Lord! A joy that the world cannot take away! (Jn 16:22) He then ate a piece of baked fish in front of their eyes! Indeed, the Lord has risen from the dead!

More importantly, the gospel also tells us that, in fact, even before his death and resurrection, when he was still with his disciples, he had already told them that he had to fulfill the Law of Moses, the prophets and the psalms, that is, the scriptures, that the Messiah was to suffer and on the third day rise from the dead and that in his name, repentance for the forgiveness of sins would be preached to all the nations beginning from Jerusalem. That is, from Jerusalem to Judea, to Samaria, and to the ends of the earth! (Ac 1:8)

And most importantly, the gospel also tells us that the disciples were to be his witnesses!

Indeed, the first reading tells us that the disciples were witnesses to his resurrection and preached repentance for the forgiveness of sins! The first reading tells us that Peter and the other apostles preached the good news of his resurrection:

“You killed the prince of life. God, however, raised him from the dead, and to that fact we are the witnesses.”! (Ac 3:15; SM)

They preached repentance for the forgiveness of sins:

“Repent and turn to God, so that your sins may be wiped out.” (Ac 3:19; SM)

Indeed, repentance is not only turning away from sin, but repentance is also turning away from the world, that is, from wealth, power, fame, etc., and more importantly, repentance is turning to God, and most importantly, repentance is turning to the God of Jesus Christ, a God of love, mercy, forgiveness and salvation; not a God of law, justice, punishment and damnation!

Thus the responsorial psalm tells us that salvation is a favor, a grace and a blessing, that is, salvation is a free gift! Thus the response of the responsorial psalm:

“Lift up the light of your face on us, O Lord.” (Ps 4:7; SM)

That is, show us your favor, O Lord! (HCSB; NJBC) Salvation is a favor, a grace, a blessing and a free gift, because the God of Jesus Christ is a God of love, mercy, forgiveness and salvation!

Thus the second reading tells us that Jesus Christ is the sacrifice that takes away our sins, and not only our sins, but the sins of the whole world! Thus we read in the second reading:

“He is the sacrifice that takes our sins away, and not only ours, but the whole world’s.” (1 Jn 2:2; SM)

That is why we have to be witnesses of the resurrection and preach repentance for the forgiveness of sins, so that all may believe and be baptized and have their sins forgiven!

Today in the Eucharist, we celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and we eat his body and drink his blood, and our Risen Lord will give us the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit will help us to be witnesses of the resurrection and preach repentance for the forgiveness of sins! Again, a Happy Easter to all of you!

Amen!

2nd Sunday of Lent (Year B) – 25th February 2018

Theme: THE CROSS OF JESUS CHRIST IS GLORIOUS: IT IS RESURRECTION AND LIFE

  • Genesis 12:1-4;
  • Psalm 32 (33):4-5. 18-20. 22. R/ v. 22;
  • 2 Timothy 1:8-10
  • Matthew 17:1-9

Today is the 2nd Sunday of Lent, Liturgical Year B, but we are using the readings of Year A, because there will be Baptism on Easter Vigil Night! Lent is a time when we prepare for Easter. Lent is a time when we prepare for the Baptism of our catechumens on Easter Vigil Night and the renewal of our own Baptism on Easter Vigil Night!

The gospel today tells us that the cross of Jesus Christ is glorious! The cross of Jesus Christ is resurrection and life! That is why today’s gospel is found immediately after Jesus predicted his passion, death and resurrection, and after he instructed his disciples to take up their crosses to follow him in order to find life!

The gospel today tells us about the transfiguration of the Lord. His face shone like the sun and his clothes became as white as light! The transfiguration was not the resurrection. It was only the preview, the foreshadow and the prefigure of the resurrection. The transfiguration was to strengthen the faith of the disciples for the coming suffering, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ!

The gospel also tells us that a voice from the cloud said, “This is my Son, the Beloved; he enjoys my favor. Listen to him”. That is, Jesus is the Son of God and the Suffering Servant of God (“he enjoys my favor”, Is 42:1), listen to him, especially when he tells you about his suffering, death and resurrection!

Finally, the gospel also tells us that Jesus ordered his disciples not to tell anyone about the transfiguration for fear that the people may mistake him to be a political, nationalistic, and military messiah, or a wonder-worker and miracle-worker messiah! Jesus is much more than all that! Jesus is the suffering messiah, the crucified Christ, the suffering and crucified Savior!

Again, the gospel today tells us that the cross of Jesus Christ is glorious! The cross of Jesus Christ is resurrection and life!

In the first reading the Lord tells Abraham to leave his country, his family and his father’s house and to go to a land that the Lord will show him. And the Lord will make him into a great nation, that is, the Lord will give him many descendents and make his descendents into a great nation! And the Lord will bless him and through him, the Lord will bless all the nations! And Abraham went as the Lord told him.

During this time of Lent, the Church asks us to pray, to fast, and to give alms; to help us leave our sins, our world, and ourselves and to go to a land that the Lord will show us. And the Lord will bless us and through us, the Lord will bless all the nations! And like Abraham, we will go as the Lord tells us!

The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the first reading. The responsorial psalm tells us to put all our hope in God and in his love! Not half our hope, but all our hope; not in man, but in God; and not in his law, but in his love! Thus the response of the responsorial psalm:

“May your love be upon us, O Lord, as we place all our hope in you.” (Ps 32 (33): 22; SM)

The responsorial psalm has three stanzas. The first stanza (vv. 4-5) tells us that the Lord created us out of love. The second stanza (vv. 18-19) tells us that the Lord saved us out of love. And the third stanza (vv. 20. 22) from which the response is taken tells us that we are to put all our hope in God and in his love! The word “love” appears in all the three stanzas, and in the response! 

In the second reading, Saint Paul tells Timothy to suffer for the preaching of the Good News, because Jesus Christ has destroyed death and has proclaimed life and immortality through the Good News! Thus we read in the second reading:

“With me, bear the hardships for the sake of the Good News, …. He (Christ Jesus) abolished death, and he has proclaimed life and immortality through the Good News.” (2 Tm 1:8. 10; SM)

During this time of Lent, the Church asks us to pray, to fast and to give alms; to help us carry our crosses to follow Jesus, that is, to help us to die to our sins, our world, ourselves and to live for God and for neighbor! The Church asks us to pray, to fast and to give alms, to help us prepare for Easter. And to help us to prepare for the Baptism of our catechumens on Eater Vigil Night and the renewal of our own Baptism on Easter Vigil Night! A blessed Lent to all of you! Amen!

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A) – 8th October 2017

Theme: THE VINEYARD OF THE LORD: ISRAEL (O.T.) AND THE CHURCH (N.T.)

  • Isaiah 5:1-7
  • Psalm 79 (80): 9. 12-16. 19-20. R. v. Is 5:7
  • Matthew 21:33-43 

Today is the 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A. The readings today tell us about the vineyard of the Lord, that is, Israel in the Old Testament, and the Church in the New Testament. Israel rejected the Lord and bore no fruit, but the Church accepted the Lord and bore fruit aplenty, bore fruit of the Spirit; bore fruit of good works!

The first reading from the prophet Isaiah tells us that the Lord had a vineyard. He dug it, removed the stones in it, and planted it with the best vines! He built a tower to guard it and a winepress to press the grapes into wine!

The Lord did all that He can do for His vineyard! The Lord expected it to yield sweet grapes, but instead it yielded sour grapes!

The Lord then will remove the wall that protects it and let it be trampled on and grazed on. The Lord will not prune it or dig it, but let the thorns grow over it. The Lord will not send down rain on it.

More importantly, the last verse of the first reading tells us that the vineyard of the Lord is the House of Israel and the men of Judah! The Lord expected fair judgment and justice, but behold injustices, violence and bloodshed; the Lord expected righteousness, honesty, and uprightness, but behold the cry of the poor in distress, pain, and suffering!

The responsorial psalm takes up the theme of the first reading. The responsorial psalm is a prayer for the restoration of the vineyard; a prayer for the restoration of Israel! Israel (Northern Kingdom) was destroyed and exiled in the 8th century BC by the Assyrians, and Judah (Southern Kingdom) was destroyed and exiled by the Babylonians in the 6th century BC! The psalm is applicable either to Israel or to Judah (NJB).

Thus the psalmist prays in stanza 1: ‘You have taken a vine out of Egypt and to plant it you drove out the nations. Its branches stretched out to the Mediterranean Sea and the Euphrates River’.

Stanza 2: ‘Then why have you broken its walls that protect it, and let it be plucked by all who pass by, and let it be ravaged by the boar of the forest, and let it be devoured by the beasts of the field’.

Stanza 3: ‘Lord God of hosts look down from heaven and see. Visit this vine of yours. The vine your right hand has planted’.

Stanza 4: ‘And we will never forsake you again. Give us life and we will call upon your name. Let your face shine on us and we shall be saved’.

The gospel tells us that the Lord answered the prayer of Israel and sent his Son Jesus Christ to save Israel, but again, Israel rejected the Lord and killed His Son Jesus Christ! Israel did not want a spiritual savior! Israel wanted a king like David with political, nationalistic and militaristic power to take revenge on the enemies and destroy the enemies! In fact if we read verses 17 and 18 of today’s psalm in the Bible, that is what Israel prayed for! But the Church left out these two verses of the psalm because the Church wanted a spiritual Savior, not a political, nationalistic and militaristic savior!

Again, the gospel today tells us that the chief priests, the elders of the people and the Jews in general rejected Jesus and killed him, but more importantly, the gospel today tells us that Jesus responded to the chief priests and the elders of the people by quoting psalm 118:22-23: ‘It is the stone rejected by the builders that has become the keystone. It is all the Lord’s doing. How wonderful it is to see’!

This quotation from psalm 118:22-23 is a prophesy of Jesus’ death and resurrection and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit!

And most importantly, and peculiar to Matthew, the gospel today tells us that the kingdom of God will be taken away from the chief priests and the elders of the people and the Jews in general, and given to a people – Jews and Gentiles – who believe in Jesus Christ and bear fruit in the power of His Holy Spirit!

Today we are the people of God who believe in Jesus Christ and we are the Church who believes in Jesus Christ and we bear fruit in the power of His Holy Spirit!

Today in this Eucharist we celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ and our Risen Lord will give us His Holy Spirit and we will bear fruit; fruit of the Spirit; fruit of good works! This is the Good News! Amen!