20th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 18th Aug 2019

Theme: JESUS CAME TO BRING PEACE, SHALOM, SALVATION!

  • Jeremiah 38:4-6. 8-10;
  • Psalm 39:2-4. 18. R/ v. 14;
  • Hebrews 12:1-4
  • Luke 12:49-53

Today is the 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Liturgical Year C. The gospel today tells us that Jesus came not to bring peace, but to bring division! That is, Jesus came to bring peace, but his peace was rejected and that is why there was division! (HCSB)

The gospel today tells us that a family of five will be divided: three against two and two against three; the father against the son and the son against the father, the mother against the daughter and the daughter against the mother, and the mother-in-law against the daughter-in-law and the daughter-in-law against the mother-in-law.

The division is between those who accept Jesus and those who reject Jesus!

But more importantly, the gospel tells us that the rejection of Jesus brought about his death and resurrection and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit which brought about unity and peace! Thus we read in the gospel today:

“Jesus said to his disciples: ‘I have come to bring fire to the earth, and how I wish it were blazing already! There is a baptism I must still receive, and how great is my distress till it is over!’” (Lk 12:49-50; SM)

The fire is the fire of the Holy Spirit, the fire of God’s love that will burn away our sins and divisions and unite us in peace in God’s love! (NJB; Lefrois) The baptism is the baptism of the cross of his death and resurrection from which the fire of the Holy Spirit is lit! (NJB)

The first reading tells us that Jeremiah was thrown into a well to die by the officials of the king, because he prophesied that they should surrender to the Babylonians or Jerusalem will be destroyed by the Babylonians! But more importantly, the first reading tells us that Jeremiah was saved from the well by an Ethiopian official of the king’s house!

The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the first reading. The responsorial psalm is a psalm of thanksgiving for salvation (vv. 2-11) and a prayer for help (vv. 12-18). Usually the psalms have it in a reverse order, that is, a prayer for help and a thanksgiving for salvation. (NJBC) We will read the responsorial psalm in this order. Thus the response of the responsorial psalm which is a prayer for help:

“Lord, come to my aid!” (Ps 39:14; SM)

The responsorial psalm has four stanzas. The fourth stanza (v. 18) like the response is a prayer for help. The first, second and third stanzas (vv. 2-4) are a thanksgiving for salvation! Note verse 4b of the third stanza:

“Many shall see and fear and shall trust in the Lord.”

That is, many shall see and be awed by the salvation of the psalmist and put their trust in the Lord and be saved themselves!

The first reading and the responsorial psalm prefigure Jesus Christ’s death and resurrection and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit for the salvation of the whole world!

The second reading is a continuation of the second reading of the previous Sunday. The second reading of the previous Sunday tells us about the example of faith of Abraham. The second reading today tells us about the example of faith of Jesus himself.

The second reading today tells us that Jesus held on to his faith in God his Father and endured the shameful death of the cross and is now glorified in heaven! In the same way in our fight against sin we must hold on to our faith until death, resurrection and glorification!

But Jesus is not only an example of faith. Through his death and resurrection and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit he perfects our faith so that we will fight sin until death and resurrection and glory! Thus we read in the second reading:

“Let us not lose sight of Jesus, who leads us in our faith and brings it to perfection: for the sake of the joy which was still in the future, he endured the cross, disregarding the shamefulness of it, and from now on has taken his place at the right of God’s throne. Think of the way he stood such opposition from sinners and then you will not give up for want of courage. In the fight against sin, you have not yet had to keep fighting to the point of death.” (Heb 12: 2-4; SM)

Today we thank God for the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ and the gift of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit brings us peace, shalom, salvation! Today we ask God to continue to give us the Holy Spirit, so that as Christians and as followers of Jesus Christ, we may also bring peace, shalom, salvation to the whole world! God bless you! Amen!

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 11th August 2019

Theme: THE END OF THE WORLD: THE SECOND COMING OF JESUS CHRIST

  • Wisdom 18:6-9;
  • Psalm 32 (33):1. 12. 18-20. 22. R/ v. 12;
  • Hebrews 11:1-2. 8-12. (Shorter Form)
  • Luke 12:35-40 (Shorter Form) 

Today is the 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Liturgical Year C. The gospel today tells us about the end of the world, that is, the end of the evil world, the Second Coming of Jesus Christ, when all will be saved!

The gospel today tells us that Jesus will come a second time, but we do not know when. That is why we must always be ready for his Second Coming! Thus the “Gospel Acclamation” today:

“Stay awake and stand ready, because you do no know the hour when the Son of Man is coming.” (Mt 24:42. 44; SM) 

And thus the gospel today ends:

“You too must stand ready, because the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect.” (Lk 12:40; SM)

To prepare for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ at the end of time, we must pray, we must do the will of God, and we must be detached from the world!

The first reading tells us that when Jesus Christ comes a second time he will destroy sin and death completely and finally and he will save the whole world!

The first reading tells us about the destruction of the first-born of the Egyptians and the salvation of the Israelites in the Exodus from Egypt! Thus the caption of the first reading:

“By the same act with which you took vengeance on our foes you made us glorious by calling us to you.” (Ws 18:8; SM)

But more importantly, the first reading prefigures the second and new Exodus of Jesus Christ’s death and resurrection and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit! The Holy Spirit destroys sin and saves us from death! Today the Holy Spirit continues to destroy sin and saves us from death in the Sacrament of Baptism!

But most importantly, the first reading prefigures the Second Coming of Jesus Christ at the end of time when sin and death will be completely destroyed and we will all be saved!

The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the Sunday. The responsorial psalm tells us that as baptized Christians we are the chosen people of God and as we prepare for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ we are to hope and pray for his love and he will rescue us from death!

The responsible psalm has three stanzas. The first stanza (vv. 1 & 12) tells us that as baptized Christians we are the chosen people of God! Thus the response which is taken from the first stanza:

“Happy are the people the Lord has chosen as his own.” (Ps 32 (33): 12; SM) 

The second stanza (vv. 18-19; SM) tells us to hope in God’s love and he will save us from death! The third stanza (vv. 20 & 22) tells us to pray and hope in God’s love and he will save us from death! (IBC)

Incidentally, the second reading also follows the theme of the Sunday. The second reading tells us that we have to hold on to our faith until the end of our lives and until the end of the world, even and especially in the face of persecutions and the Lord will save us! The second reading was addressed to the Jewish Christians who were persecuted and who were losing their faith! (NJB; CCB)

The second reading gives us the example of Abraham! Abraham held on to his faith even in the face of many obstacles! Abraham had to go to a land he did not know. He was promised a son in his old age and his wife was barren. And finally he was asked to sacrifice Isaac, the son of the promise! (Longer Form, vv. 17-19; SM) But, because of his faith, Abraham was blessed with many descendants, as many as the stars of heaven and as many as the grains of sand on the seashore!

We are therefore to hold on to our faith to the end of our lives and to the end of the world, even in the face of persecutions and we will be blessed with salvation!

Today we thank God for the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit for the forgiveness of our sins and for saving us from death. And we ask God to continue to give us the Holy Spirit to help us to prepare for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ when all will be saved! Again, we prepare for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ by prayer, by doing the will of God and by detaching ourselves from the world! God bless you!  Amen!

18th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 4th August 2019

Theme: MONEY CANNOT BUY LIFE, LOVE AND HAPPINESS

  • Ecclesiastes/Qoheleth 1:2; 2:21-23;
  • Psalm 89 (90):3-6. 12-14. 17. R/ v. 1;
  • Colossians 3:1-5. 9-11
  • Luke 12:13-21

Today is the 18th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Liturgical Year C. The readings today tell us that money cannot buy life, love and happiness. Life, love and happiness are the three most important things! They are found in heaven! And God gives them to us through the death and resurrection of his Son and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit! Seek first the kingdom of God and all the other things will be given to you as well! That is, seek first salvation and all of creation will be given to you as well!

The gospel today tells us that a man in the crowd asked Jesus to tell his brother to give him his share of their inheritance, but Jesus did not respond to his request. Instead Jesus told them something more important, that is, life does not come from wealth, even if we have more than we need! Then Jesus told them the “parable of the rich fool”:

There was once a rich man who had a bountiful harvest. The harvest was so plentiful that he had to build new storehouses to store his harvest! Then the rich man thought to himself that his harvest will last him a life time, he will now take things easy and eat and drink and have a good time; but that very night God took away his soul, that is, he died!

We may not be physically dead, but we may be spiritually dead, that is, our souls may be dead because of sin and there is no life, love and happiness in our souls. Like the “rich fool” we cannot enjoy our rich harvest, that is, though we may be rich we have no life, love and happiness!

That is why the “Gospel Acclamation” today tell us:

“How happy are the poor in spirit; theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” (Mt 5:3; SM)   

The poor in spirit are not only the materially or spiritually poor, but the poor in spirit are those who are dependent on God and God will bless them with his life, love and happiness from heaven!    

The first reading follows the theme of the gospel, but the first reading is not good news, but bad news! The first reading tells us that without God our lives are futile, empty and meaningless! “Vanity of vanity”! We work hard day and night year after year only to die and leave our possessions to others who never worked for it. And to make things worse our possessions may all be wasted in one generation by those who never worked for it! (Qo 2:18-19) “Vanity of vanity”! Without God it is all futility, emptiness and meaninglessness!

The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the Sunday. The responsorial psalm tells us that life and death, and love and happiness come from God. That is why we have to pray for wisdom to live a life of love and happiness!

The responsorial psalm has four stanzas. The first and second stanzas (vv. 3-6) tell us that life and death come from God! The third and fourth stanzas (vv. 12-14. 17) tell us to pray for wisdom to live a life of love and happiness! The fourth stanza (v. 17) also tells us to pray for God’s blessings so that the work of our hands may be successful! Thus the response:

“O Lord, you have been our refuge from one generation to the next.” (Ps 89 (90):1; SM) 

Incidentally, the second reading also follows the theme of the Sunday. The second reading has two paragraphs. The first paragraph (vv. 1-4) tells us to look for the things of heaven so that we can find life (NJB), love and happiness!

The second paragraph (vv. 5. 9-11) tells us not to look for the things of earth, because the things of earth may tempt us to sin and sin brings death and in death there is no love and happiness!

Today we thank God for creation and we ask God to give us the Holy Spirit of his life, love and happiness! Again, seek first the kingdom of God and all the other things will be given to you as well! (Lk 12:31; Mt 6:33) That is, seek first salvation and all of creation will be given to you as well! God bless you! Amen!

17th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 28th July 2019

Theme: WE PRAY TO GOD OUR FATHER BECAUSE HE IS LOVE, MERCY, FORGIVENESS AND SALVATION

  • Genesis 18:20-32;
  • Psalm 137 (138):1-3. 6-8. R/ v. 3;
  • Colossians 2:12-14
  • Luke 11:1-13

Today is the 17th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Liturgical Year C. The readings today tell us to pray to God our Father, because he is love, mercy, forgiveness and salvation! The gospel today tells us about the Lord’s Prayer! It is taken from the gospel of St. Luke.

The Lord’s Prayer in St. Luke is different from that of St. Matthew which is called the “Our Father” and which we pray during Mass! The Lord’s Prayer of St. Luke has no “Our” before “Father”. It is more original and closer to Jesus’ teaching. It has only 5 petitions, while St. Matthew has 7 petitions. St. Matthew favors the number 7!

To begin with, the Lord’s Prayer or the Our Father is the prayer of a “child” to the Father! A child is totally dependent on the Father and he trusts the Father totally. The Father on the other hand protects and provides for the child. The child without the Father is totally helpless and hopeless! That is why the priests pray the Our Father during Mass with outstretched, upwards and open palms!

Thus in the first petition of the Our Father we ask God our Father to make his name holy. In the second petition we ask God our Father to make his kingdom come. And after praying first that the Father’s will be done, we pray for our own needs. Thus in the third petition of the Our Father we pray for daily bread, especially the bread of the Eucharist! In the fourth petition, we pray for forgiveness of our sins as we forgive others who sin against us. And in the fifth petition we pray that we may not lose our faith (apostasy; NJBC), especially in times of persecution!

The second part of the gospel tells us that we have to pray persistently and perseveringly. We have to pray the Our Father persistently and perseveringly. The Our Father is the model of all prayers taught to us by Jesus himself! It is a prayer of faith. Without faith we cannot pray. Again, it is the prayer of a “child” totally dependent on the Father and totally trusting in the Father! All our prayers have to be modeled after the Our Father and we have to pray all our prayers persistently and perseveringly!

The third part of the gospel tells us that our prayers will be effective, that is, God will answer our prayers! Indeed God answers our prayers by giving us the Holy Spirit! And it is in the power of the Holy Spirit that God’s name will be made holy in us, with us and through us! And it is in the power of the Holy Spirit that God’s kingdom will come in us, with us and through us!

And it is through the power of the Holy Spirit that God will give us our daily bread, especially the bread of the Eucharist! And it is through the power of the Holy Spirit that God will forgive our sins so that we will also forgive the sins of others. And it is through the power of the Holy Spirit that we will not lose our faith and apostatize even in times of severe persecutions.

The first reading tells us that Abraham prayed persistently and perseveringly to God who is just and merciful! (NJB; IBC) The first reading tells us that God wanted to destroy Sodom and Gomorrah because of their sins, but Abraham prayed and bargained with God not to destroy the just men with the wicked men, because it was unjust to destroy the just men with the wicked men, and because God was just! Abraham prayed and bargained with God persistently and perseveringly from fifty, forty-five, forty, thirty, twenty to just ten just men and God agreed not to destroy the ten just men with the wicked men! In being just to the just men, God was also being merciful to the wicked men!

The responsorial psalm is a thanksgiving for salvation! Thus the response:

“On the day I called, you answered me, O Lord.” (Ps 137:3; SM)

That is, ‘On the day I called, you saved me, O Lord.’ The responsorial psalm has four stanzas. The first and second stanzas (vv. 1-3) tell us that God saves us because God loves us. God is faithful love! The third and fourth stanzas (vv. 6-8) tell us to pray to God because he loves us and saves us! (CSB; NJBC)

The second reading tells us that through his death and resurrection and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, Jesus has forgiven us our sins. He has nailed our sins to the cross! And we receive this forgiveness in the sacrament of Baptism! Thus we read in the caption of the second reading:

    “He has brought you to life with him, he has forgiven us all our sins.” (Col 2:13; SM)

Today we thank God for the gift of the Holy Spirit which makes us call God, “Our Father”, and we ask God to continue to give us the Holy Spirit so that we may make his name holy and so that we may make his kingdom come on earth! God bless you! Amen!