28th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 9th Oct 2022

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 9th Oct 2022

Theme: GIVE THANKS TO GOD

  • 2 Kings 5:14-17;
  • Psalm 97:1- 4. R/ cf. v. 2;
  • 2 Timothy 2:8-13
  • Luke 17:11-19

1. Today is the 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Liturgical Year C. The readings today tell us to give thanks to God! Our God is a gracious, giving, blessing and favoring God! The proper response to our God is therefore one of thanksgiving!

The gospel today tells us that ten lepers were cured, but only one came back to thank the Lord. More importantly, the gospel today tells us that ten lepers were cured, but only one had faith and was saved! That is the one who came back to thank the Lord!

Indeed, our Sunday Eucharist is a thanksgiving! The word Eucharist in Greek means thanksgiving! Indeed our Eucharistic Prayer which begins at the Preface and ends at the Doxology is a thanksgiving! Thus all the eight “Prefaces of the Sundays in Ordinary Time” begin thus:

“It is truly right and just, our duty and our salvation, always and everywhere to give you thanks, Lord, holy Father, almighty and eternal God, (through Christ our Lord)”. 

Note that it is our salvation to give thanks to God! In short, those who come to Mass every Sunday to give thanks to God have faith and are saved, but those who do not come to Mass every Sunday to give thanks to God have no faith and are not saved! That is why it is a Mortal Sin not to come to Mass every Sunday!

The Gospel Acclamation today tells us:

“For all things give thanks, because this is what God expects you to do in Christ Jesus”. (1 Thessalonians 5:18; SM)

The fourteenth century German Dominican theologian and mystic Meister Eckhart wrote:

“The most important prayer in the world is just two words long: thank you”. (Gilhooley)

In our own century an American Dominican theologian said that if the only prayer we know is “thank you”, that is good enough!

If we start thanking God right here and now, we will not be able to finish thanking him even at the end of the world! We thank God for the sun and moon, for the sea and land, for the fish and animals, etc.! We thank God for creation, for salvation and for sanctification!

We thank God for the good things as well as the “bad” things, because we believe that God is love and that God can draw good out of evil (Gn 50:20), draw life from death (NT), draw grace from sin, etc.! Thus the Easter Proclamation:

“O happy fault, O necessary sin of Adam, which gained for us so great a Redeemer!” (SM) 

Thus we begin our Sunday Mass with this greeting:

“The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with you all”.

    Indeed, God is love and God can draw grace from sin in Jesus Christ!

2. The first reading follows the theme of the gospel. The first reading tells us to thank God and not to thank the prophet, or priest, or minister; because they are not God, they are only servants of God!

    The first reading tells us that Naaman after being cured of his leprosy wanted to give the prophet Elisha a present to thank him, but Elisha refused the present, because he was not God. He was only a servant of God! Consequently, Namaan asked for some of the soil of Israel so that he can erect an altar on the soil of Israel in Damascus, Syria, to worship the God of Israel, that is, to praise and thank the God of Israel!  

3. The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the first reading. The responsorial psalm tells us to praise God for salvation! Thus the response:

“The Lord has shown his salvation to the nations”. (Ps 97:2; SM)

And thus the first and last sentences of the responsorial psalm:

“Sing a new song to the Lord for he has worked wonders” (Ps 97:1; SM)

“Shout to the Lord all the earth, ring out your joy”. (97:4; SM)

4. The second reading tells us to proclaim the good news even in the face of persecution, suffering and death, so that all may believe and be saved and give praise to God! Thus we read in the second reading:

“Remember the Good News that I carry, ‘Jesus Christ risen from the dead, sprung from the race of David’; it is on account of this that I have my own hardships to bear, even to being chained like a criminal – but they cannot chain up God’s news. So I bear it all for the sake of those who are chosen, so that in the end they may have the salvation that is in Christ Jesus and the eternal glory that comes with it.” (2 Tm 2:8-10; SM)

5. Today we thank God for our salvation, and we ask God to continue to give us the Holy Spirit, so that we may proclaim the Good News, even in the face of persecution, suffering and death, and so that all may believe and be saved and give thanks to God! God bless you! Amen!

27th Sunday in Ordinary (Year C) – 2nd October 2022

27th Sunday in Ordinary (Year C) – 2nd October 2022

Theme: FAITH: TO BELIEVE IN GOD, TO DO THE WILL OF GOD, AND TO PROCLAIM THE GOOD NEWS OF GOD

  • Habakkuk 1:2-3; 2:2-4;
  • Psalm 94:1-2. 6-9. R/ v.8;
  • 2 Timothy 1:6-8. 13-14
  • Luke 17:5-10

1. Today is the 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Liturgical Year C. The readings today tell us about faith! That is, faith is believing in God, doing the will of God and proclaiming the good news of God, so that others may also believe in God and do the will of God!

The gospel today tells us that even if our faith is as small as a mustard seed, we can tell the big mulberry tree to uproot itself and be planted in the sea and it will obey us! To uproot a big mulberry tree with deep roots and to plant it in the sea is doubly impossible! But with faith in God all things are possible! With God all things are possible! 

The second part of the gospel tells us that faith is doing the will of God, that is, serving God! (NJBC; Vatican II, Sunday Missal) Thus we read at the end of the gospel today:

“So with you: when you have done all you have been told to do, say, ‘We are merely servants: we have done no more than our duty.’” (Lk 17:10; SM)

Thus the first question of the YOUCAT (Youth Catechism):

“For what purpose are we here on earth?

We are here on earth in order to know and to love God, to do good according to his will, and to go someday to heaven.”

That is, what is the meaning of life? To know God, to love God, to serve God, and to be happy with God forever! To know God, that is, faith; to love God, because God is love and because God first loved us; to serve God, because we love God; and to be happy with God forever in heaven! That is the secret to happiness! That is the meaning of life!

2. The first reading follows the theme of the gospel. The first reading tells us that those who believe in God and do his will, will live, that is, will find life, love and happiness! Thus the caption of the first reading:

“The upright man will live by his faithfulness.” 

That is, the upright man who believes in God and does his will, will live!

But the first reading also tells us that those who do not believe in God and do not do the will of God will not find life!

The first reading tells us that the prophet Habakkuk questioned God as to why God was not doing anything about the injustice, the oppression, the violence, etc., in Judah and with the pagan Babylonians. (HCSB; Faley) And God answered that the unjust who practiced oppression and violence will not find life! Thus we read in the first reading:

“See how he flags, he whose soul is not at rights, but the upright man will live by his faithfulness.” (Hab 2:4; SM) 

3. The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the first reading. The responsorial psalm tells us to be faithful to God, that is, to have faith in God and to obey God! Thus the response:

“O that today you would listen to his voice! Harden not your hearts.” (Ps 94:8; SM)

The responsorial psalm has three stanzas. The first and second stanzas tell us to praise and worship God who is our shepherd and savior! The third stanza from which the response is taken tells us to be faithful to God, that is, to believe in God and to do his will! (CSB; NJBC) Thus the third stanza:

“O that today you would listen to his voice! Harden not your hearts as at Meribah, as on that day at Massah in the desert when your fathers put me to the test; when they tried me, though they saw my work.” (Ps 94:7c-9; SM)

Meribah (Hebrew), that is, to quarrel with God! Massah (Hebrew), that is, to test God! That is, do not quarrel with God and do not test God, but be faithful to God!

4. The second reading tells us to proclaim the good news even in the face of suffering, so that all may believe in God and do the will of God! Thus we read in the second reading:

“So you are never to be ashamed of witnessing to the Lord, or ashamed of me for being his prisoner; but with me, bear the hardships for the sake of the Good News, relying on the power of God.” (2 Tm 1:8; SM)

5. Today we thank God for the gift of faith and we ask God to increase our faith, to help us do his will and to proclaim his good news, so that others may also believe in God and do the will of God! God bless you! Amen!

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 25th September 2022

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 25th September 2022

Theme: PRACTICE JUSTICE AND CHARITY TOWARDS THE POOR AND NEEDY

  • Amos 6:1. 4-7;
  • Psalm 145:6-10. R/ v. 2;
  • 1 Timothy 6:11-16
  • Luke 16:19-31

1. Today is the 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Liturgical Year C. The readings today follow the theme of the readings of last Sunday, that is, “Practice Justice and Charity towards the Poor and the Needy”. Last Sunday the first reading from the prophet Amos told us that the rich and the powerful oppressed and exploited the poor and the weak. They practiced social injustice towards the poor and the weak. The prophet Amos preached against social injustice. Amos was a prophet of social justice! Last Sunday the first reading ended with this warning:

“The Lord swears it by the pride of Jacob, ‘Never will I forget a single thing you have done.’” (Am 8:7; SM)

The first reading of this Sunday is also from the prophet Amos. The first reading tells us that the rich and powerful who eat and drink, and sing and play music, and anoint themselves with perfumed oil, and enjoy themselves, will be exiled by the Assyrians. Thus the first reading ends with this warning:

“That is why they will be the first to be exiled; the sprawlers’ revelry is over.” (Am 6:7; SM)

2. Last Sunday the responsorial psalm told us to praise God who raises the poor:

“Praise the Lord, who raises the poor”. (Ps 112:1. 7; SM)

This Sunday the responsorial psalm tells us to praise God who is just to those who are oppressed, who gives bread to the hungry, who sets prisoners free, who gives sight to the blind, who raises up those who are bowed down, who loves the just, who protects the stranger, and who upholds the widow and orphan. Thus the response of the responsorial psalm:

“My soul, give praise to the Lord”. (Ps 145:2; SM)

3. Last Sunday the “long form” of the gospel told us to practice charity:

“And so I tell you this: use money, tainted as it is, to win you friends, and thus make sure that when it fails you, they will welcome you into the tents of eternity.” (Lk 16:9; SM)

That is, to make friends with the poor and to share with the poor!

This Sunday the gospel also tells us to practice charity! The gospel today tells us of the parable of the rich man and Lazarus! The sin of the rich man was that he did not practice charity towards the poor man Lazarus! The gospel today tells us of the parable of the rich man who ate and drank sumptuously everyday, while the poor man Lazarus lay at his gate with nothing to eat or drink, not even the scraps that fell from the rich man’s table! Only dogs came to lick his wounds, that is, he was an outcast!

But when Lazarus died he went to heaven! The rich man also died and went to hell! And in his torment in hell he asked Abraham to send Lazarus to dip the tip of his finger in water to quench his thirst. But Abraham replied that the gulf between heaven and hell was too wide for anyone to cross from one side to the other.

In the second part of the gospel the rich man asked Abraham to send Lazarus to warn his five brothers so that they will not come to hell. But Abraham replied that they have Moses and the prophets, they can listen to them. The rich man then told Abraham that they will listen if someone comes to them from the dead! But Abraham replied that if they do not listen to Moses and the prophets they will not listen even if someone rises from the dead! That is, if they do not listen to the Scriptures they will not listen to Jesus even when he rises from the dead!

The gospel today tells us to listen to the Scriptures and to the Risen Lord and to practice charity towards the poor and the needy!

4. The second reading does not follow the theme of the Sunday but the second reading has something very important to tell us! The second reading tells us that we must do the will of God and we must not commit sin, until the Second Coming of our Lord Jesus Christ! (1 Tm 6:13-14; SM) The best way to prepare for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ is to pray, to do the will of God, to avoid sin, and to be detached from this world!

Coincidentally, the verse that comes immediately before the second reading and the three verses that comes immediately after the second reading follow the theme of the Sunday! They tell us about money! Thus we read:

“‘The love of money is the root of all evils’ and there are some who, pursuing it, have wandered away from the faith and so given their souls any number of fatal wounds.” (1 Tm 6:10; NJB)  

“Instruct those who are rich in this world’s goods that they should not be proud and should set their hopes not on money, which is untrustworthy, but on God who gives us richly all that we need for our happiness. They are to do good and be rich in good works, generous in giving and always ready to share – this is the way they can amass a good capital sum for the future if they want to possess the only life that is real.” (1 Tm 6: 17-19; NJB)

5. Today we thank God for all our material blessings and we ask the Lord to help us practice justice and charity towards the poor and the needy! God bless you! Amen!

25th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 18th September 2022

25th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 18th September 2022

Theme: TO SERVE GOD AND NOT TO SERVE MONEY

  • Amos 8:4-7;
  • Psalm 112 (113):1-2. 4-8. R/ cf. vv. 1. 7;
  • 1 Timothy 2:1-8
  • Luke 16:1-13 (Shorter Form, verses 10-13)

1. Today is the 25th Sunday in Ordinary time, Liturgical Year C. The readings today tell us to serve God and not to serve money. That is, to use money to serve God and neighbor, and not to use God and neighbor to serve money. Money cannot buy us love, life and happiness! Only God can give us love, life and happiness!

    The gospel today tells us to serve God and not to serve money:

    “No servant can be the slave of two masters: he will either hate the first and love the second, or treat the first with respect and the second with scorn. You cannot be the slave both of God and of money.” (Lk 16:13; SM)

    The gospel today tells us that the steward used his money to serve God and neighbor. The steward subtracted his commission from the debts of his master’s debtors by reducing the one hundred measures of oil to fifty measures of oil and by reducing the one hundred measures of wheat to eighty measures of wheat. (CSB; NJB; IBC) By using his money to serve God and neighbor the steward obtained eternal life! Thus we read in the gospel:

    “And so I tell you this: use money, tainted as it is, to win you friends, and thus make sure that when it fails you, they will welcome you into the tents of eternity.” (Lk 16:9; SM)        

2. The First reading follows the theme of the gospel. The first reading tells us to practice social justice. That is, we must not cheat – especially the poor – in our business dealings, in our buying and selling. We must not buy below the fair price and sell above the fair price! We must not tamper with the scales! We must not practice “debt bondage”!

    We must buy and sell at a fair price. We must practice social justice by paying the poor a just wage and by providing them with decent living conditions, health care, insurance, retirement fund, etc. Thus we read in the first reading:

    “Listen to this, you that trample on the needy and try to destroy the poor of the country. You say to yourselves, ‘…. we can overcharge, use false measures, and fix the scales to cheat our customers. We can sell worthless wheat at a high price. We’ll find a poor man who can’t pay his debts, not even the price of a pair of sandals, and we’ll buy him as a slave.’

    The Lord, the God of Israel, has sworn, ‘I will never forget their evil deeds.”’ (Am 8:4-7; GNB)

    Pope Benedict XVI tells us that besides practicing justice we must also practice charity! That is why every year during the season of Lent we have the “Lenten Appeal” to help the poor! The “Lenten Appeal” helps the poor throughout the year!    

3. The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the first reading. The responsorial psalm tells us to praise God, who raises the poor! God raises the poor materially through justice and spiritually through peace (shalom), that is, salvation! Thus we have the “Justice and Peace Commission” to raise the poor! Thus the response of the responsorial psalm:

    “Praise the Lord, who raises the poor.” (Ps 112 (113): 1. 7; SM)

    The responsorial psalm has three stanzas. The first stanza tells us to praise God. The second stanza tells us to exalt God. The third stanza tells us that God raises the poor. (NJBC; Craghan) Thus we read in the third stanza:

    “From the dust he lifts up the lowly, from the dung heap he raises the poor to set him in the company of princes, yes, with the princes of his people.” (Ps 112 (113): 7-8; SM)      

4. The second reading does not follow the theme of the Sunday, but the second reading has something important to tell us. The second reading tells us to pray not only for ourselves, but to pray also for non-Christians! This is because there is only one God who wants to save all and there is only one mediator Jesus Christ who came to save all. And that is why Paul himself is an apostle to proclaim the good news to the pagans so that all may be saved!

    The second reading also tells us to pray especially for kings and rulers so that there will be justice and freedom of religion and so that all may be saved. Finally, the second reading tells us to pray with a sincere heart without anger or argument, and with uplifted hands in a posture of supplication!  

5. Today in the Eucharist, we celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and we eat his body and drink his blood, and our Risen Lord will give us the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit will help us to serve God and not to serve money. The Holy Spirit will help us to use money to serve God and neighbor and not to use God and neighbor to serve money. The Holy Spirit will help us to practice justice and charity.

Amen. 

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 11th September 2022

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) – 11th September 2022

Theme: GOD IS MERCIFUL: HE SEEKS OUT AND SAVES SINNERS

  • Exodus 32:7-11. 13-14;
  • Psalm 50 (51):3-4. 12-13. 17. 19. R/ Lk 15:18;
  • 1 Timothy 1:12-17;
  • Luke 15:1-32 (Shorter Form, verses 1-10)

1. Today is the 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Liturgical Year C. The readings today tell us that God is merciful and that he seeks out and saves sinners! The gospel today tells us in three parables that God is merciful and that he seeks out and saves sinners! The three parables are the Parable of the Lost Sheep, the Parable of the Lost Coin, and the Parable of the Lost Son (the Prodigal Son).

    The first Parable on the Lost Sheep tells us that God is like the shepherd who leaves the ninety-nine sheep in the wilderness to look for the lost sheep until he finds it. And when he finds it he calls together his friends and neighbors to rejoice with him because he has “found the sheep that was lost”. The gospel tells us that in the same way there is more rejoicing in heaven over one repentant sinner than over ninety-nine virtuous men who have not need of repentance! 

    The second Parable on the Lost Coin tells us that God is like the woman who has ten coins. When she loses one of the coins, she lights a lamp and sweeps the house until she finds the lost coin. And when she finds the coin she calls together her friends and neighbors to rejoice with her because she has “found the coin” she lost! The gospel tells us that in the same way the angels of God rejoice over one repentant sinner!

    The third Parable on the Lost Son tells us that God is like the father who is always on the lookout for his lost son. When he sees him from afar he runs to him and clasps him and kisses him. He puts the best robe on him, puts a ring on his finger and puts sandals on his feet. He then slaughters the fattened calf to feast and celebrate because his son was dead and has come back to life, “was lost and is found”!          

    Again, the gospel today tells us that God is merciful and that he seeks out and saves sinners!

2. The first reading follows the theme of the gospel. The first reading tells us that the people of Israel worshipped the golden calf! God was angry with them and wanted to destroy them, but Moses pleaded with God not to destroy them, because of the promise God made to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob that their descendents will be as many as the stars of heaven!

    And more importantly, the first reading tells us that God relented and did not destroy them: “So the Lord relented and did not bring on his people the disaster he had threatened.”! Indeed, God is merciful!       

3. The responsorial psalm follows the theme of the first reading. The responsorial psalm tells us to repent and turn back to God who is merciful. Thus the response of the responsorial psalm which is taken from the Parable of the Lost Son from the gospel of today:

    “I will leave this place and go to my father.”! (Lk 15:18)

    The responsorial psalm has three stanzas. In the first stanza we ask God to forgive us our sins. In the second stanza we ask God to give us the Holy Spirit so that we will not sin anymore. In the third stanza we praise and thank God for forgiving us our sins and giving us the Holy Spirit so that we will not sin anymore!    

4. Finally, the second reading tells us that God does not only save sinners, but God also call sinners to be his apostles! The second reading tells us that Paul was the greatest sinner, but he became the greatest apostle! Thus we read in the second reading:

    “Here is a saying that you can rely on and nobody should doubt: that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners. I myself am the greatest of them; and if mercy has been shown me, it is because Jesus Christ meant to make me the greatest evidence of his inexhaustible patience for all the other people who would later have to trust in him to come to eternal life.” (1 Tm 1:15-16)

    “I thank Christ Jesus our Lord, who has given me strength, and who judged me faithful enough to call me into his service even though I used to be a blasphemer and did all I could to injure and discredit the faith.” (1 Tm 1:12-13a)

5. Today in the Eucharist, we celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and we eat his body and drink his blood, and our Risen Lord will give us the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit will help us to repent and to turn back to God who is merciful, and the Holy Spirit will help us become apostles of Jesus Christ!   

Amen!